US AC130 gunship which bombed Somali territory (January 2007) purportedly in pursuit of “terrorists”. The attacks represent an escalation of American aggression in the Horn of Africa.The United States proxy war against Somalia has escalated with the massacre of civilians by AC130 gunships. The resistance to American intervention in Somalia is growing despite the presence of thousands of western-backed Ethiopian troops which invaded the country.

The National Conference of Black Lawyers has just published a position paper on AFRICOM, written up in the pan-african news wire:

The National Conference of Black Lawyers (NCBL) concludes that the mission of Africa Command (Africom) infringes on the sovereignty of African states due to the particularity of Africa’s history and Africa’s current economic and political relationship to the United States.

Further, Africom is designed to violate international law standards that protect rights to self determination and that prohibit unprovoked military aggression.

Africom is also likely to become a device for the foreign domination and exploitation of Africa’s natural resources to the detriment of people who are indigenous to the African continent.
. . .
In the past Washington has aided reactionary African factions that have carried out atrocities against civilians. An increased U.S. military presence in Africa will likely follow this pattern of extracting resources while aiding factions in some of their bloodiest conflicts, thus further destabilizing the region.”
. . .
This raises special concerns because the threat to Africa’s political and economic integrity comes not only from the U.S. government, but also from the multi-national corporations that are the beneficiaries of government policies.

In recent years, this is seen most dramatically in Congo . . .
. . .
All of this raises critical questions of whether, with Africom, the U.S. is now positioning itself to become more directly involved – with or without proxies – in protecting corporate access to Africa’s resources. In many other parts of the world, the U.S. has engaged in “regime change” as a matter of course for more than a century as a method of protecting the interests of the corporate world.
. . .
With disturbing frequency, the U.S. has in recent decades launched unprovoked military attacks on other countries, or intervened in the internal affairs of other countries through the use of mercenaries or covert action designed to destabilize foreign governments or the economic, political or social order.

This article provides a brief and concise history of US intervention in Africa. It also touches on how the US has used mercenaries and proxies in the resource wars.