A court case, brought by hispanic parents may have ended this, but after half a century of school desegregation, we still have this as reported in the Dallas Morning News:

For years, it was an open secret at North Dallas’ Preston Hollow Elementary School: Even though the school was overwhelmingly Hispanic and black, white parents could get their children into all-white classes. And once placed, the students would have little interaction with the rest of the students.
. . .

Preston Hollow’s unwritten policy of clustering whites together was known for years among parents and teachers, according to testimony. In fact, Mrs. Parker’s subordinates – including teachers and her assistant principal – raised concerns about it multiple times. One even wrote a letter to Superintendent Michael Hinojosa about it. Those complaints fell on deaf ears, the judge wrote.

“I began to see something very strange,” Ms. Santamaría said in Spanish. “The difference was that the Anglo students would go to lunch together while the Latinos went with the Asians and the African-Americans.” That, she said, raised a question in her mind “because the children don’t know what segregation is.”
. . .

. . . In reserving certain classrooms for Anglo students, Principal Parker was, in effect, operating, at taxpayer’s expense, a private school for Anglo children within a public school that was predominantly minority.”