For values voters, or anyone who thinks they are a values voter, it is THE question. As David Niewert points out: torture is not “toughness.” It is in fact a sign of weakness — particularly the moral kind.


The baseline problem with torture, after all, is that it is prima facie immoral, a violation not just of the Golden Rule and basic Christian precepts, but of nearly any system of ethics. Even the most hard-nosed rationalist will come to this conclusion (see, e.g., Kant’s Categorical Imperative). It’s an obvious one if you’re a Christian.

All you have to present to any Christian, when it comes to torture, is their own favorite moral-guidepost aphorism: What Would Jesus Do?
. . .
The torturer is the enemy of mankind.

Does America want to become known around the world as the nation that tortures? Does America, which likes to think of itself as the “beacon of democracy” around the world, want to instead become known as “the enemy of mankind”?

This is a question that can be put to any American, regardless of their faith.

But for the Christians out there — including those who insist we are a “Christian nation” — the question can be put in much simpler terms: Given the chance, would Jesus attach the electrodes and pull the switch? Would he waterboard? Would he dangle them in chains and beat their feet? Would he stand by and watch while others do it in his name?

And a thank you to GOTV for spotting this article.